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3. Submillimeter

Submillimeter wave astronomy is a relatively new branch of astronomy that studies celestial objects using the submillimeter band of the electromagnetic spectrum, which ranges from 0.1 millimeters to 1.0 millimeters (300 GHz to 3000 GHz). This band, which lies between the far infrared and high-frequency radio bands, contains valuable astonomical data (in form of both continuum emissions and molecular radiations), but has been unavailable to astronomers until recently because most of the radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere. In order to overcome this barrier, submillimeter observatories such as the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) are usually placed at high altitude.[1]

Photo: Caltech Submillimeter Observatory in Hawaii

  • Herschel Featured Article Herschel Herschel

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Herschel Last Updated on 2009-10-01 15:52:59 The Herschel Space Observatory will be the largest ever infrared space observatory. Equipped with a 3.5 metre diameter reflecting telescope and instruments cooled to close to absolute zero, Herschel will observe at wavelengths that have never previously been explored. Herschel has a nominal mission lifetime of three years in orbit around the second Lagrange point of the Sun-Earth system (L2). Infrared astronomy is a young and exciting science. In recent decades infrared astronomers have unveiled tens of thousands of new galaxies, and have made surprising discoveries such as the huge amounts of water vapour that fill our Galaxy. Yet scientists know there is still much more to discover. Objects such as other planetary systems, or processes like the birth of galaxies in the early Universe, can best be studied with infrared telescopes situated in space and therefore freed from the... More »
La Silla Paranal Observatory - ESO - Overview Last Updated on 2009-06-05 00:00:00 La Silla Paranal Observatory Northern Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. RSS Feed Contact Public Portal In the Public Portal you will find information about ESO, Press Releases, Outreach Activities, Events and About Astronomical Research using ESO's facilities. Also, information for ESO's Industrial Partners and About Employment at ESO. Science Portal The Science Portal is intended for professional astronomers who plan to use or are using ESO observing facilities. The Science area also provides information about ESO's Science Activities and Projects, Meetings and Publications.   La Silla, in the southern part of the Atacama desert, 600 km north of Santiago de Chile and at an altitude of 2400 metres is the home of ESO's original observing site. Here ESO operates three major telescopes: the 3.6-m telescope, the New Technology Telescope (NTT), and the 2.2-m Max-Planck-ESO... More »