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Cosmos Portal

Welcome to the Cosmos Portal

The Cosmos Portal  is a gateway on the Web to astronomy and space science. We invite astronomy professionals to publish articles, blogs, news items, image galleries, videos, class notes, lectures, powerpoint presentations, links to other high quality websites or other educational material.   LEARN MORE »

In parallel amateur astronomy organizations and amateur astronomers and telescope makers are invited to start websites in the Community Sites.   LEARN MORE »

TOPIC OF THE WEEK:
GALAXIES

  • Curiosity Rover Featured News Article Curiosity Rover Curiosity Rover

    The Curiosity Rover is designed to examine Martian rocks and soils. Two instruments on its arm can study rocks up close, a drill can collect sample material and a scoop can... More »

  • International Space Station Featured Article International Space Station International Space Station

    The goals of the International Space Station (ISS) are to establish a permanent habitable residence and laboratory for science and research, and to maintain and support a human... More »

  • XMM-Newton Featured Article XMM-Newton XMM-Newton

    The European Space Agency's X-ray Multi-Mirror satellite is the most powerful X-ray telescope ever placed in orbit. Scientists are sure the mission will help solve many cosmic... More »

  • 'We Are All Connected' Featured Video 'We Are All Connected'

    "We Are All Connected" was made from sampling Carl Sagan's Cosmos, The History Channel's Universe series, Richard Feynman's 1983 interviews, Neil deGrasse Tyson's... More »

  • The Night Sky:  September 2015 Featured Blog Post The Night Sky:  September 2015 The Night Sky: September 2015

    The Night Sky in September 2015 By Harry J. Augensen Professor of Physics & Astronomy, Widener University Moon's Phases New Moon on the... More »

Recently Updated
The Night Sky: September 2015 Last Updated on 2015-08-28 23:46:47 The Night Sky in September 2015 By Harry J. Augensen Professor of Physics & Astronomy, Widener University Moon's Phases New Moon on the 13th           Full "Harvest Moon" on the 27th Stars and Constellations Autumn officially arrives in the Northern Hemisphere on September 23rd at 4:21 am Eastern Daylight Time, but the first three-quarters of September belong to summer. Indeed, the stars of summer are still well placed for viewing during the early evening hours. Low in the southwest is orange-red Antares, often referred to as the "heart" of the constellation Scorpius, with the planet Saturn located to its west in the neighboring constellation Libra. To Antares' far left are a pair of unequally bright stars, Shaula and Lesath, known as the "Cat’s Eyes." To the east of Scorpius is... More »
The Night Sky: August 2015 Last Updated on 2015-07-27 18:59:18 The Night Sky in August 2015 By Harry J. Augensen Professor of Physics & Astronomy, Widener University Moon's Phases New Moon on the 14th                Full "Sturgeon Moon" or "Green Corn Moon" on the 29th Stars and Constellations The beginning of August marks the midpoint of astronomical summer in the Northern Hemisphere, halfway between the Summer Solstice on June 21st and the Autumnal Equinox on September 23rd. Traditionally the first day of August was celebrated in the Celtic culture as Lammas, or the festival of the wheat harvest. Astronomically, August 1 is designated one of four "cross-quarter days," or halfway points between the solstices and the adjacent equinoxes. The other cross-quarter days correspond approximately with known holidays: February 2nd... More »
The Night Sky: July 2015 Last Updated on 2015-06-25 18:50:18 The Night Sky in July 2015 By Harry J. Augensen Professor of Physics & Astronomy, Widener University Moon's Phases Full "Thunder Moon" on the 1st         New Moon on the 15th          Full "Blue Moon" on the 31st               Stars and Constellations As June transitions into July, most of the spring stars are fading into the twilight, not to return to the evening sky until early in 2016. Blue-white Regulus, the brightest star in the constellation Leo, is sinking toward the western horizon in early evening and sets around 10 pm in mid-July. Of similar color but slightly brighter is Spica, in Virgo, which sets in the southwest around midnight. Yellow-orange Arcturus, in Boötes the Herdsman, stands high... More »
The Night Sky: June 2015 Last Updated on 2015-05-29 18:14:06 The Night Sky in June 2015 By Harry J. Augensen Professor of Physics & Astronomy, Widener University Moon's Phases Full "Strawberry Moon" on the 2nd          New Moon on the 16th Stars and Constellations The stars of spring shine prominently as night falls on warm June evenings, and the first of the spring stars to emerge from the evening twilight is Arcturus, the night sky's fourth brightest star, in the constellation of Boötes, the Herdsman. Arcturus has a distinct yellow-orange tinge, and by around 9 pm EDT lies high in the south. Also easily found is bluish-white Regulus in the constellation Leo, the Lion. Regulus stands high in the southwest in early evening, and sets around midnight. (This year the brilliant planet Jupiter lies to Regulus's right.) Spica, a star which possesses a similar bluish-white... More »
The Night Sky: May 2015 Last Updated on 2015-05-04 15:17:45 The Night Sky in May 2015 By Harry J. Augensen Professor of Physics & Astronomy, Widener University Moon's Phases Full "Flower Moon" on the 3rd              New Moon on the 18th Stars and Constellations As darkness falls on May evenings, outdoor temperatures become pleasantly cool and the air is perfumed with the scent of newly sprung blossoms of lilac and viburnum. Although the first bright stars do not emerge from the evening twilight until around 8:30 or 9 pm, the wait is worth it. As darkness envelopes the sky in early May, try to catch a last glimpse of some of the familiar bright stars of winter – Aldebaran, Rigel, Betelgeuse, Sirius, and Procyon – before they vanish into the dusk, not to reappear in the evening sky until next autumn. Pollux, Castor, and Capella are setting in the... More »