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Cosmos Portal

Welcome to the Cosmos Portal

The Cosmos Portal  is a gateway on the Web to astronomy and space science. We invite astronomy professionals to publish articles, blogs, news items, image galleries, videos, class notes, lectures, powerpoint presentations, links to other high quality websites or other educational material.   LEARN MORE »

In parallel amateur astronomy organizations and amateur astronomers and telescope makers are invited to start websites in the Community Sites.   LEARN MORE »

TOPIC OF THE WEEK:
GALAXIES

  • Curiosity Rover Featured News Article Curiosity Rover Curiosity Rover

    The Curiosity Rover is designed to examine Martian rocks and soils. Two instruments on its arm can study rocks up close, a drill can collect sample material and a scoop can... More »

  • International Space Station Featured Article International Space Station International Space Station

    The goals of the International Space Station (ISS) are to establish a permanent habitable residence and laboratory for science and research, and to maintain and support a human... More »

  • XMM-Newton Featured Article XMM-Newton XMM-Newton

    The European Space Agency's X-ray Multi-Mirror satellite is the most powerful X-ray telescope ever placed in orbit. Scientists are sure the mission will help solve many cosmic... More »

  • 'We Are All Connected' Featured Video 'We Are All Connected'

    "We Are All Connected" was made from sampling Carl Sagan's Cosmos, The History Channel's Universe series, Richard Feynman's 1983 interviews, Neil deGrasse Tyson's... More »

  • The Night Sky:  April 2014 Featured Blog Post The Night Sky:  April 2014 The Night Sky: April 2014

    The Night Sky in April 2014 By Harry J. Augensen Professor of Physics & Astronomy, Widener University Moon’s Phases Full "Egg Moon" on the... More »

Recently Updated
The Night Sky: April 2014 Last Updated on 2014-03-30 17:56:11 The Night Sky in April 2014 By Harry J. Augensen Professor of Physics & Astronomy, Widener University Moon’s Phases Full "Egg Moon" on the 15th      New Moon on the 29th Stars and Constellations The start of April heralds the departure of the winter constellations from the evening sky. Aldebaran and the Pleiades cluster, both in Taurus, are now setting in the west, and will not reappear until next autumn. Betelgeuse and Rigel in Orion are setting in the southwest, followed by Sirius in Canis Major. The twin stars Pollux and Castor in the constellation Gemini are up in the south-southwest, to the upper left of brilliant Jupiter, while Procyon in Canis Minor lies just to the east of Gemini. The yellow star Capella, in Auriga, is now high in the northwest. While the stars of winter make their leisurely exit, the stars of spring are... More »
The Night Sky: March 2014 Last Updated on 2014-03-02 15:15:59 The Night Sky in March 2014 By Harry J. Augensen Professor of Physics & Astronomy, Widener University Moon’s Phases New Moon on the 1st                Full "Worm Moon" on the 16th Stars and Constellations March ushers in a welcome transition between the frigid nights of winter and the cool, more tolerable nights of spring. The transition becomes apparent in the night sky as well, for the constellations of winter, which have so dominated the celestial stage since December, will over the next several weeks be vanishing into the evening twilight. The star Aldebaran in Taurus and the compact star cluster Pleiades, or Seven Sisters, can still be spotted high in the west. Just west of overhead is the yellow star Capella, and Betelgeuse and Rigel in Orion are high in the south-southwest. The... More »
The Night Sky: February 2014 Last Updated on 2014-02-01 23:57:21 The Night Sky in February 2014 By Harry J. Augensen Professor of Physics & Astronomy, Widener University Moon’s Phases Full "Snow Moon" on the 14th Stars and Constellations February nights bring with them not only frigid temperatures but also a brilliant tapestry of stars. The constellation Cassiopeia, which represents the throne of the Queen of ancient Ethiopia, can be seen high in the northwest, looking like the letter "M." Even higher in the northwest above Cassiopeia is Perseus, whose brightest stars form a horn shape which opens toward the nearby Pleiades cluster. Nearly overhead on February evenings is Auriga, the Charioteer, with the bright yellow star Capella as its "eye." Just south of Auriga is Taurus the Bull, with its bright orange star Aldebaran. Aldebaran is classed as a red giant star, and it stands in the foreground of a... More »
The Night Sky: January 2014 Last Updated on 2013-12-31 18:36:03 The Night Sky in January 2014 By Harry J. Augensen Professor of Physics & Astronomy, Widener University Moon’s Phases New Moon on the 1st         Full "Wolf Moon" on the 15th Stars and Constellations Clear January nights are typically the coldest of the year, but those who brave the frigid conditions will be rewarded by a magnificent tapestry of brilliant winter stars and constellations. At dusk or shortly thereafter, it may still be possible to spot two bright holdovers from warm summer nights – the stars Vega and Deneb – before they vanish into the twilight. A handful of autumn stars, too, are still visible, including those belonging to Cetus, the Whale, and the four stars which comprise the Great Square of Pegasus, which are now descending in the west. But it is the stars of winter which dominate the... More »
The Night Sky: December 2013 Last Updated on 2013-11-29 18:23:21 The Night Sky in December 2013 By Harry J. Augensen Professor of Physics & Astronomy, Widener University Moon’s Phases New Moon on the 2nd         Full "Long Night Moon" on the 17th Stars and Constellations The Sun's apparent annual path in the sky takes it through the constellations of Ophiuchus and Sagittarius during December. This is, of course, merely an effect of perspective created as Earth orbits about the Sun. Just after midnight, on December 21st at 12:11 am EST, the Sun reaches its southernmost position on the celestial sphere, in Sagittarius, marking the official beginning of winter in the Northern Hemisphere. While the stars of autumn rightly dominate the early evening, a famous trio from the summer – Altair, Vega, and Deneb – can still be seen before they vanish into the impending winter... More »