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Cosmos Portal

Welcome to the Cosmos Portal

The Cosmos Portal  is a gateway on the Web to astronomy and space science. We invite astronomy professionals to publish articles, blogs, news items, image galleries, videos, class notes, lectures, powerpoint presentations, links to other high quality websites or other educational material.   LEARN MORE »

In parallel amateur astronomy organizations and amateur astronomers and telescope makers are invited to start websites in the Community Sites.   LEARN MORE »

TOPIC OF THE WEEK:
GALAXIES

  • Curiosity Rover Featured News Article Curiosity Rover Curiosity Rover

    The Curiosity Rover is designed to examine Martian rocks and soils. Two instruments on its arm can study rocks up close, a drill can collect sample material and a scoop can... More »

  • International Space Station Featured Article International Space Station International Space Station

    The goals of the International Space Station (ISS) are to establish a permanent habitable residence and laboratory for science and research, and to maintain and support a human... More »

  • XMM-Newton Featured Article XMM-Newton XMM-Newton

    The European Space Agency's X-ray Multi-Mirror satellite is the most powerful X-ray telescope ever placed in orbit. Scientists are sure the mission will help solve many cosmic... More »

  • 'We Are All Connected' Featured Video 'We Are All Connected'

    "We Are All Connected" was made from sampling Carl Sagan's Cosmos, The History Channel's Universe series, Richard Feynman's 1983 interviews, Neil deGrasse Tyson's... More »

  • The Night Sky:  August 2014 Featured Blog Post The Night Sky:  August 2014 The Night Sky: August 2014

    The Night Sky in August 2014 By Harry J. Augensen Professor of Physics & Astronomy, Widener University Moon’s Phases Full "Sturgeon Moon" or "Green... More »

Recently Updated
The Night Sky: August 2014 Last Updated on 2014-07-31 18:58:17 The Night Sky in August 2014 By Harry J. Augensen Professor of Physics & Astronomy, Widener University Moon’s Phases Full "Sturgeon Moon" or "Green Corn Moon" on the 10th          New Moon on the 25th Stars and Constellations As soon as darkness falls on August evenings, the first star to appear is orange-yellow Arcturus, which stands high in the west about an hour or so after sunset. The Big Dipper, a part of the constellation Ursa Major, is now dipping lower toward the northwestern horizon. The two front stars in the Big Dipper point to Polaris, the North Star, while the arc of the Big Dipper's handle leads to Arcturus. If the sky is dark enough, you may be able to see the Little Dipper, which is part of Ursa Minor, extending outward from Polaris toward the Big Dipper. One of the remaining stars of... More »
The Night Sky: July 2014 Last Updated on 2014-06-30 23:59:01 The Night Sky in July 2014 By Harry J. Augensen Professor of Physics & Astronomy, Widener University Moon’s Phases Full "Thunder Moon" on the 12th            New Moon on the 26th Stars and Constellations On July evenings one must patiently wait until after 9 pm for the sky to become dark enough to make out the basic constellation patterns. This fact, along with the increased haze and humidity in mid-summer, presents challenges for the stargazer. Once twilight fades into night, you should be able to spot orange Arcturus high in the south. Arcturus is classified as a giant star, with a diameter of over 30 times that of our Sun, and lies about 37 light years from our solar system. Two of the brightest stars of spring are disappearing into the evening twilight. Blue-white Regulus is moving toward the western... More »
The Night Sky: June 2014 Last Updated on 2014-05-31 21:41:57 The Night Sky in June 2014 By Harry J. Augensen Professor of Physics & Astronomy, Widener University Moon’s Phases Full "Strawberry Moon" on the 13th            New Moon on the 27th Stars and Constellations June is the month of seasonal transition from spring into summer, which by astronomical definition occurs this year on the 21st. Fittingly, the stars associated with both spring and summer are on display in the night sky in June: the spring stars are best viewed during the early evening hours, while those of summer dominate mainly later at night, especially toward midnight. Even a small number of bright stars left over from winter can still be seen shortly after nightfall in the first half of the month. These include the two brightest stars of Gemini, Pollux and Castor, which are now setting in the... More »
The Night Sky: May 2014 Last Updated on 2014-05-02 00:05:34 The Night Sky in May 2014 By Harry J. Augensen Professor of Physics & Astronomy, Widener University Moon’s Phases Full "Flower Moon" on the 14th            New Moon on the 28th Stars and Constellations May nights are a favorite time to observe the stars. Not only are the nighttime temperatures pleasantly cool, with just a light jacket required, but also the air is perfumed with the scent of newly sprung blossoms of lilac and viburnum. On the other hand, those large trees whose branches were bare during winter are now leafing out, therefore obscuring parts of the sky. Moreover, one needs to wait until around 8:30 pm to see the first stars come out at the beginning of the month, and until about 9 pm by month’s end. Get one last look at Aldebaran and the Pleiades star cluster, Rigel and Betelgeuse,... More »
The Night Sky: April 2014 Last Updated on 2014-03-30 17:56:11 The Night Sky in April 2014 By Harry J. Augensen Professor of Physics & Astronomy, Widener University Moon’s Phases Full "Egg Moon" on the 15th      New Moon on the 29th Stars and Constellations The start of April heralds the departure of the winter constellations from the evening sky. Aldebaran and the Pleiades cluster, both in Taurus, are now setting in the west, and will not reappear until next autumn. Betelgeuse and Rigel in Orion are setting in the southwest, followed by Sirius in Canis Major. The twin stars Pollux and Castor in the constellation Gemini are up in the south-southwest, to the upper left of brilliant Jupiter, while Procyon in Canis Minor lies just to the east of Gemini. The yellow star Capella, in Auriga, is now high in the northwest. While the stars of winter make their leisurely exit, the stars of spring are... More »